Jump to Navigation

Health Sector

The Potential of Big Data Applications for the Healthcare Sector

 

At the industrial Big Data Conference Big Data Minds in Berlin, Prof. Sonja Zillner presented "The Potential of Big Data Applications for the Healthcare Sector". With the presentation of the BIG Data Public Private Forum discussed the challenges of BIG Data and the emerging Data Economy for the Healthcare Sector. In particular,  the results of the BIG user needs and requisites study for the Big Data applications in the Healthcare Sector were introduced. The study shows that Big Data technologies can be used to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare delivery.  However, the realization of Big Data applications in the healthcare sector is challenging. In order to take advantage of the promising opportunities of Big Data technologies, a clear understanding of driver and constraints, user needs and requirements is needed.

The feedback of the audience was very good and several participants of the conference requested the access of the BIG Requirements Study.

Categories:

BIG Final Event Workshop

Programme of the BIG Final Event Workshop co­located with ISC Big Data in Heidelberg 

 

The Big Project

Welcome and Introduction Nuria De Lama (ATOS Spain)  

 

Key Technology Trends for Big Data in Europe 

Edward Curry (Research Fellow at Insight @ NUI Galway) 

presentation

 

The Big Data Public Private Partnership 

Nuria De Lama (ATOS Spain)

presentation 

 

Panel discussion about a common Big Data Stakeholder Platform 

Martin Strohbach (AGT International)  

● The PPP Stakeholder Platform

(Nuria De Lama

● Hardware and Network for Big Data

(Ernestina Menasalvas, RETHINK BIG EU Project) 

● Tackling BIG DATA Externalities

(Kush Wadhwa, Trilateral Research BYTE EU Project) 

● The value of the Stakeholder platform

(Sebnem Rusitschka, Siemens, BIG and BYTE Project) 

 

Networking and Break-out Sessions

 

update will follow

 

 

Big Data Applications in the Healthcare Domain Presentation at IEEE IRI 2014

From 13th to 15th August 2014, the 15th IEEE International Conference on Information Reuse and Integration took place in San Francisco, USA. Sabrina Neururer had the chance to present the accepted paper entitled “Towards a Technology Roadmap for Big Data Applications in the Healthcare Domain” to a broad public on the first day of the conference. Very good feedback was received that confirmed the results of the presented study and highlighted the huge impact of Big Data applications on the healthcare domain. Technical challenges, such as semantic annotation, data sharing, data quality, privacy and security, and open R&D questions were discussed. Also non-technical challenges for Big Data Applications, such as user acceptance, were debated intensively.

Categories:

Big Data Healthcare Applications Presentation at MIE 2014

MIE 2014

At September 1st at the 25th European Medical Informatics Conference (MIE 2014), Dr. Sonja Zillner presented "User Needs and Requirements Analysis for Big Data Healthcare Applications"  which was received very well . As the realization of the promising opportunities of big data technologies for healthcare relies on the integrated view on heterogeneous health data sources in high quality and the availability of legal frameworks for secure data sharing,  an intensive discussion of how to address the mentioned health data management challenges was triggered.

Categories:

Two Accepted Papers in the Health Sector

Two new publications by Sonja Zillner et al. have gotten accepted on international conferences. See http://big-project.eu/publications for all project publications.
 
User Needs and Requirements Analysis for Big Data Healthcare Applications (MIE 2014)
The realization of big data applications that allow improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare care delivery is challenging. In order to take advantage of the promising opportunities of big data technologies, a clear understanding of user needs and requirements of the various stakeholders of healthcare, such as patients, clinicians and physicians, healthcare provider, payors, pharmaceutical industry, medical product suppliers and government, is needed.
Our study is based on internet, literature and market study research as well as on semi-structured interviews with major stakeholder groups of healthcare delivery settings. The analysis shows that big data technologies could be used to align the opposing user needs of improved quality with improved efficiency of care. However, this requires the integrated view of various heterogeneous data sources, legal frameworks for data sharing and incentives that foster collaboration.
Towards a Technology Roadmap for Big Data Applications in the Healthcare Domain (IEEE IRI HI)
Big Data technologies can be used to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare delivery. The highest impact of Big Data applications is expected when data from various healthcare areas, such as clinical, administrative, financial, or outcome data, can be integrated. However, as of today, the seamless access to the various healthcare data pools is only possible in a very constrained and limited manner. For enabling the seamless access several technical requirements, such as data digitalization, semantic annotation, data sharing, data privacy and security as well as data quality need to be addressed. In this paper, we introduce a detailed analysis of these technical requirements and show how the results of our analysis lead towards a technical roadmap for Big Data in the healthcare domain.

Categories:

D2.3.2 Pre-Final Version of Sector Requisites Available

Update: Final version available now.
 
The pre-final version of the sector requisites, deliverable 2.3.2, is available now. Its findings on user needs and requirements represent the starting point for the development of the big data roadmap for the European sectors. For this purpose the ongoing consultations with the technical working groups on the big data value chain will be continuously cross-checked with sector representatives and against current and future developments of the big data trend.
The following sectors are analyzed:
Several developments in the healthcare sector, such as escalating healthcare cost, increased need for healthcare coverage and shifts in provider reimbursement trends, trigger the demand for big data technology.
The public sector is facing some important challenges today, the lack of productivity compared to other sectors, current budgetary constraints, and other structural problems due to the aging population that will lead an increasing demand for medical and social services, and a foreseen lack of a young workforce in the future.
The energy and transportation sectors, from an infrastructure perspective as well as from resource efficiency and quality of life perspectives, are very important for Europe. The high quality of the physical infrastructure and global competitiveness of the stakeholders also needs to be maintained with respect to the digital transformation and big data potentials.
The telecom sector seems to be convinced of the potential of Big Data Technologies. The combination of benefits within marketing and offer management, customer relationship, service deployment and operations can be summarised as the achievement of the operational excellence for telco players.
The media and entertainment industries have frequently been at the forefront of adopting new technologies. The key business problems that are driving media companies to look at Big Data capabilities are the need to reduce costs of operating in an increasingly competitive landscape, and at the same time, the need to increase revenue from delivering content.
The retail sector will be dependent on the collection of in-store data, product data and customer data. To be successful in future, retailers must have the ability to extract the right information out of huge data collections acquired in instrumented retail environments in real-time.
The core requirements in the manufacturing sector are the customisation of products and production—“lot size one”—the integration of production in the larger product value chain, and the development of smart products.

Data Curation Insights - Interview with James Cheney

The second interview of the Data Curation Insights-series is now available on our website.
Edward Curry, BIG-member and member of the Digital Enterprise Research Institute at the National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG), arranged an interview with James Cheney, a Royal Society University Research Fellow at the laboratory for foundation of Computer Science at the University of Edinburgh.
After a few words about James career and his background at the University of Edinburgh, the interview gives some insights into James work and the role of big data (curation) for his institution.
James specifically talks about curation projects he and his colleagues interacted with, mainly in biomedical data and elborates on the uses and value of the curated data in those projects.
Edward Curry wanted to know about the processes and technologies which were involved in  James' data curation projects. The design of those processes and the performance of the technologies were of special interest to him.
 
During the Interview, James not only talks about the influence big data has on data curation but also explains the technical demand of curation and curation technologies in the big data context..
The last part of the interview is dedicated to James’ view on the influence of big data in future data curation and which data curation technologies will actually be able to cope with big data in the future.
You want to read the full Interview ? Visit our  website !!  
 
Interested in data curation news? Follow  Edward Curry @EdwardACurry on Twitter.
The next interview will be published soon! Don't miss it an follow us on twitter  @BIG_FP7 
 
 

Smart Ways To Deal With Big Data

BIG-project member Siemens recently published an article on smart ways to deal with big data.
The article was released shortly before the Christmas Holidays in the December edition of urbanDNA, a magazine for the metropolitan world.The article briefly introduces the BIG project, the work done in BIG and highlights smart ways of  urban applications of big data.
The article is available in the December Issue (No.3) of urbanDNA.
You find further information in big data and the BIG project on our website.

The BIG project at Big Data World Congress, Munich, 3-4 December 2013

The BIG project had a strong presence at BIG Data World Congress in Munich in early December. There was a strategically-positioned stand  in the exhibition hall. We met a number of delegates from many industrial sectors and countries, especially in the “speed dating” session where we perfected the BIG project’s elevator pitch in the quick-fire conversations! Project flyers and stickers were available in many places for people who wanted to learn about the project after the conference. The two day event was closed by a presentation from the BIG project’s director Josema Cavanillas, introducing the aims of the project and the outputs of our research.
 
The event featured case studies and panels on every aspect of Big Data technologies including governance, unstructured data, real-time analytics and much more. Attendees came from a wide range of organisations, including some big players in sectors such as manufacturing and telecoms. One exciting potential avenue of collaboration may be for BIG to work with the USA’s NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) as they are also developing cross-sector consensus requirements and roadmaps for Big Data.
 
Many speakers talked about how adopting Big Data could revolutionise the ways businesses operate, driving efficiency and faster product development. It is recognised by most if not all senior level executives as one of the key IT trends of the next few years - but this comes with the caveat that Big Data initiatives need to be aligned to clear outcomes and business processes in order to have a chance of success. The structure of organisations may need to be adapted to enable technical and business expertise to work together more closely to enable value to be derived from data. Even then, the pace of industry change may be such that organisations will look to form partnerships with start-ups and universities so as to drive innovation. The BIG project’s Public Private Forum could be a key enabler for these communities.
Europe-specific issues were highlighted in several talks. There was criticism of the apparent risk aversion of technology companies and their customers and the lack of a widespread start-up culture (apart from a few isolated exemplars). There are differences between Europe and the US in terms of data protection, the EU’s tougher legislation possibly being a barrier to innovation for some firms (on the other hand, the US’s relatively lax laws may have implications for privacy and the ethics of extensive data collection by businesses).
 

BIG at ICT 2013, November 7-9, Vilnius

ICT 2013 was held in Vilnius, Lithuania from November 7th to the 9th. Nearly 5,000 delegates attended in order to discover the latest innovations and trends in ICT, and to gather information about the European Commission’s priorities for its Horizon 2020 research programme. The conference was supplemented by an extensive exhibition and three unique “villages” showcasing cutting-edge local and international technology companies.
 
A common thread running through the event was the potential societal impact of a data-driven economy. This includes issues such as privacy, surveillance and data protection, as well as positive aspects like improving healthcare, empowering all groups of society and tackling climate change.
 
The EU Commissioner for the Digital Agenda, Neelie Kroes, gave a forceful keynote speech describing Big Data as a new “asset class”, as important a pillar of the economy as human resources or financial capital. The effect on productivity, public sector transparency, research and the environment could be transformative. Europe’s cultural and legislative advantages should be used to tackle challenges such as ICT education, the skills gap, barriers to market entry for SMEs and a lack of leadership in the technology sector.
 
A packed programme of Networking Sessions provided attendees with many opportunities to learn about applications for Big Data technologies. For example, genomic research being led by Valencia University depends on cloud infrastructures and scalable data mining tools to ensure that the right, not just more data is analysed. Other speakers showed how Big Data underpins the success of open data, drives new job creation and speeds up innovation.
 
The BIG project co-hosted a Networking Session with NESSI (a high-profile pan-European platform to promote innovation in software and services). The theme of the session was research into data value towards Horizon 2020. Data could be the driving force behind economic growth and European competitiveness globally, but work and collaboration are needed to fully understand the potential. Large companies such as Atos, Siemens, SAP and Thales are committed to a joint initiative for data value, recognising that industrial co-operation can drive progress. NESSI launched the Big Data Value Manifesto - a call to action for organisations to shape the future of Big Data.
 
Nuria de Lama from Atos highlighted the outputs of the BIG project, namely the sector requisites, technical white papers and a consolidated roadmap.

Pages

Cialis sales are available on many trusted Internet sites. In humans, cialis has no effect on bleeding time when taken alone or with aspirin.

Subscribe to Health Sector


Main menu 2

by Dr. Radut